Beef Bone Broth

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Beef Bone Broth

I always thought bone broth and stock were interchangeable terms. Until I made my own real bone broth and could both see and taste the difference.

If you've been around nutrition circles for a while, then the concept of bone broth has probably made it's way into your awareness.

Let's chat about the benefits of a bone broth.

The method of making bone broth is to leach out the minerals from animal bones through a long simmer. Depending on what kind of bone broth you are making the simmering times vary.

I've made lamb, chicken, turkey and beef bone broth to date. And each is it's own culinary adventure. Playing with spices and even the vegetables that you use can give you your own unique flair and preference.

Bone broth helps the body heal. It has been found to help with digestive disturbances as well as to help facilitate reduced joint pain and arthritis. Bone Broth contains compounds such as collagen, proline, glycine and glutamine. The minerals that are found in it, such as calcium, magnesium, phosphorous and silicon, are in forms that your body can easily absorb.

For a long time, I was taking chondroitin and glucosamine in supplement form for inflammation and joint pain. Guess what? Found in Bone broth. Goodbye pricey supplements.

Prep Time 1 hour

Ingredients

  • 2 lbs Grass Fed Organic Beef Bones
  • 2 Yellow Onions
  • 3 Carrots
  • 8 Stalks of Celery
  • 1 head Garlic, Smashed
  • 2 tbsp Pink Himalayan Sea Salt
  • 1 tbsp Mixed Peppercorns
  • 5 gallons Filtered Water
  • 2 tbsp Apple Cider Vinegar
  • 1 bunch Parsley

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to roast the beef bones at 350 for 30 minutes. I line my baking sheet with parchment paper and keep all of the grease that the roasted bones leave for me to add to the simmering broth.

  2. After roasting, transfer the bones to a large stock pot. Add enough filtered water to fully cover them. I use approximately 5 gallons of locally sourced spring water.

  3. Add the Apple Cider Vinegar and allow the bones to sit in the water/vinegar for 30 minutes. 

  4. Roughly chop the vegetables. I don't even peel mine. I just make sure they are free of dirt and toss them in. 

  5. Add the salt, peppercorns, smashed head of garlic, parsley and any other spices you would like to have in your finished product.

  6. Bring the broth to a rapid boil and remove any scum that rises to the top during this 20 minute period. Grass fed organic bones will not have as much, if any, impurities rise to the top, fyi. 

  7. Reduce the heat and simmer for 48 hours. 

  8. Remove the bones and the vegetables. Discard the vegetables, but keep the bones. You can continue using the bones until you have leached everything out of them. You will know this is the case when you can break them with your hands. 

  9. Strain the broth through a mesh sieve or nut milk bag. 


  10. Transfer to glass mason jars.

  11. Bone broth can be stored in the fridge for up to 5 days. Or frozen for later use.